Welcome to the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study

Founded in 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study is one of the longest running and most comprehensive ecosystem studies in the world. The collaborative, multidisciplinary research efforts include long-term studies of air, water, soils, plants, and animals. The study site is the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, a 7,800-acre northern hardwood forest situated in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study is a unique public-private partnership involving the USDA Forest Service, the National Science Foundation’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, and scientists from research institutions throughout the country.


News and Highlights

Storytelling

On July 9, 2019, Hubbard Brook hosted its first ever live storytelling event: The Moss. Nine Hubbard Brook community members shared personal stories on the theme of "Unexpected Encounters."

Thanks to climate change and wetter weather, forest soils are absorbing less methane

Farming, energy production, and landfills produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Forests can remove methane from the atmosphere through the activity of soil bacteria. But increasing precipitation – a symptom of climate change – is making it harder for forest soils to trap greenhouse gases, creating a feedback loop that exacerbates global warming.