Winter climate change and fine root biogenic silica in sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum): Implications for silica in the Anthropocene

TitleWinter climate change and fine root biogenic silica in sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum): Implications for silica in the Anthropocene
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsMaguire, TJ, Templer, PH, Battles, JJ, Fulweiler, RW
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume122
Issue3
Pagination2016JG003755
Date Published2017/03/01/
ISBN Number2169-8961
Accession NumberHBR.2017-43
Keywordsbiogenic silica pools, northern hardwood forest, reduced winter snowpack, Soil freezing, terrestrial silica cycle
Abstract

Winter temperatures are projected to increase over the next century, leading to reductions in winter snowpack and increased frequency of soil freezing in many northern forest ecosystems. Here we examine biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations in sugar maple (Acer saccharum) fine roots collected from a snow manipulation experiment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Increased soil freezing significantly lowered the BSi content of sugar maple fine roots potentially decreasing their capacity to take up water and dissolved nutrients. The reduced silica uptake (8 ± 1 kmol silica km−2) by sugar maple fine roots is comparable to silica export from temperate forest watersheds. We estimate that fine roots account for 29% of sugar maple BSi, despite accounting for only 4% of their biomass. These results suggest that increased frequency of soil freezing will reduce silica uptake by temperate tree roots, thereby changing silica availability in downstream receiving waters.

URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JG003755/abstract
DOI10.1002/2016JG003755
StartPage

2016JG003755

Short TitleJ. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci.