Research Highlights

Cues for Masting in Sugar Maple and American Beech

Many tree species exhibit the phenomenon of seed (or fruit) “masting” in which all the trees in a population produce large seed crops in a particular year. For some species this synchronous behavior is thought to favor successful regeneration by saturating seed predators, like squirrels, that also serve as seed dispersal agents – so many seeds are produced in a mast year that the squirrels don’t eat them all. But what cues all the trees in a population to mast synchronously?

An Ice Storm Manipulation Experiment in a Northern Hardwood Forest

ICE STORMS are an important natural disturbance in forest ecosystems of the "ice belt" that covers a broad area extending from east Texas to New England. These glazing events (defined as 0.25 in. of ice accretion or more) are often perceived as rare occurrences, even though the return interval is as short as 2-5 years in the most ice storm prone northeastern U.S. In this region, ice storms are a major cause of forest disturbance. 

Embedding Public Engagement with Science at LTER Sites

Embedding Public Engagement with Science at Long-Term Ecological Research Sites (PES @ LTERs) is a new collaborative project led by the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, Harvard Forest, Michigan State University, Boston University, and CUNY. The goal of the project is to integrate public engagment into the cultures and practices of two LTER sites, Hubbard Brook and Harvard Forest, and to build knowledge about the mutual learning that takes place between scientists and adult stakeholders in multiple engagement settings.