Effects of Harvesting Forest Biomass on Water and Climate Regulation Services: A Synthesis of Long-Term Ecosystem Experiments in Eastern North America

TitleEffects of Harvesting Forest Biomass on Water and Climate Regulation Services: A Synthesis of Long-Term Ecosystem Experiments in Eastern North America
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsCaputo, J, Beier, CM, Groffman, PM, Burns, DA, Beall, FD, Hazlett, PW, Yorks, TE
JournalEcosystems
Pagination1 - 13
Date Published2015/10/27/
ISBN Number1432-9840, 1435-0629
Keywordsclimate regulation, Ecology, ecosystem services, Environmental Management, forest biomass, forest recovery, Geoecology/Natural Processes, Hydrology/Water Resources, Plant Sciences, tradeoff analysis, water regulation, Zoology
Abstract

Demand for woody biomass fuels is increasing amidst concerns about global energy security and climate change, but there may be negative implications of increased harvesting for forest ecosystem functions and their benefits to society (ecosystem services). Using new methods for assessing ecosystem services based on long-term experimental research, post-harvest changes in ten potential benefits were assessed for ten first-order northern hardwood forest watersheds at three long-term experimental research sites in northeastern North America. As expected, we observed near-term tradeoffs between biomass provision and greenhouse gas regulation, as well as tradeoffs between intensive harvest and the capacity of the forest to remediate nutrient pollution. In both cases, service provision began to recover along with the regeneration of forest vegetation; in the case of pollution remediation, the service recovered to pre-harvest levels within 10 years. By contrast to these two services, biomass harvesting had relatively nominal and transient impacts on other ecosystem services. Our results are sensitive to empirical definitions of societal demand, including methods for scaling societal demand to ecosystem units, which are often poorly resolved. Reducing uncertainty around these parameters can improve confidence in our results and increase their relevance for decision-making. Our synthesis of long-term experimental studies provides insights on the social-ecological resilience of managed forest ecosystems to multiple drivers of change.

URLhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-015-9928-z
Short TitleEcosystems