Climate change imposes phenological trade-offs on forest net primary productivity

TitleClimate change imposes phenological trade-offs on forest net primary productivity
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsDuveneck, MJ, Thompson, JR
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume122
Issue9
Pagination2017JG004025
Date Published2017/09/01/
ISBN Number2169-8961
Accession NumberHBR.2017-48
Keywords0428 Carbon cycling, 1622 Earth system modeling, 1630 Impacts of global change, 9345 Large bodies of water (e.g., lakes and inland seas), 9350 North America, ecosystem respiration, forest net primary productivity, growing season length, New England, phenology
Abstract

Climate warming is expected to lengthen growing seasons of temperate forest ecosystems and increase gross primary productivity. Simultaneously, warming is expected to increase summer ecosystem respiration, which could offset gains accrued from longer growing seasons. These responses have been observed during anomalously warm years, but the role of future climate change on phenological trade-offs and how they affect net primary productivity (NPP) at regional scales in temperate forests remain unexplored. We simulated scenarios of climate change on monthly forest NPP throughout 18 million hectares of temperate forests in New England, USA, through year 2100. Using an ecophysiological model coupled to a forest landscape model, we simulated scenarios of climate change on monthly NPP. A high emission scenario (RCP 8.5), resulted in longer growing seasons that offset midsummer ecosystem respiration costs and produced greater annual NPP throughout the study landscape compared to simulations using the current climate. In spring and autumn months, temperature was positively associated with greater NPP; in summer months, the relationship was negative. Spatially, the greatest increase in NPP occurred in the warmer southern region under a warm climate scenario with increased precipitation. Under a warm scenario with drier conditions, the greatest increase in NPP occurred in the cooler northern region. Phenological trade-offs will affect NPP of future forests and their potential to serve as a negative feedback to climate change. Barring other limitations, longer growing seasons will offset greater respiratory demands and contribute to increases in NPP throughout the temperate forests of New England in the future.

URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JG004025/abstract
DOI10.1002/2017JG004025
StartPage

2017JG004025

Short TitleJ. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci.