Hubbard Brook Monthly - March 2020

April 1, 2020
 
HUBBARD BROOK MONTHLY March 2020 issue
 
Recent Publications
 
Harrison, JL, AB Reinmann, AS Maloney, N Phillips, SM Juice, AJ Webster, PH Templer. 2020. Transpiration of Dominant Tree Species Varies in Response to Projected Changes in Climate: Implications for Composition and Water Balance of Temperate Forest Ecosystems. Ecosystems.
 
If your publication is missing from this list, please let us know: sciencelinks@hubbardbrookfoundation.org
 
Hubbard Brook in the News
 
NH Scientists Complete Major Study On How Ice Storms Damage Northern Forests
 
Cold, wet experiments in New Hampshire forest show that ice storms are worse than we figured
 
New and Revised Datasets
 
NEW:
Groffman, P., J. Weitzman, and L. Martel. 2019. Measurements of N cycling dynamics in the soils of the Ice Storm Experiment (ISE) plots at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/5f7a351e64dc4c0dc06bb8ff14edf245.
 
Groffman, P., J. Weitzman, and L. Martel. 2019. Measurements of gross N cycling rates in the soils of the Ice Storm Experiment (ISE) plots at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/4eab26a01233f2404a36e4322dc844bb.
 
Groffman, P., J. Weitzman, and L. Martel. 2019. Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: Ice Storm Experiment Trace Gas ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/5f3f41d567ee60fc6352684164dc20bd.
 
Vadeboncoeur, M.A., K.A. Jennings, A.P. Ouimette, and H. Asbjornsen. 2019. Wood alpha-cellulose stable C isotope ratios from New Hampshire and Vermont ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/de0c8b529b7c2b986eb36d0287397065.
 
Minocha, R. and S. Long. 2020. Red spruce foliar nutritional and metabolic responses to N, Ca, and N+Ca additions in a plot level study from Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest NH, Adirondack State Park, NY and Groton State Forest, VT from 1997-2000. ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/c83553901cb01f8c5e86313f90d15482.
 
Minocha, R. and S. Long. 2020. Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on foliar and sapwood nutrition and metabolism of sugar maple trees growing at the west edge of WS6 of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest from 1997-2009. ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/a287c4efa691179e3f74d60d1935d6ac.
 
Minocha, R. and S. Long. 2020. Foliar and sapwood nutritional and metabolic responses to Ca-treatment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, 2000 – 2015 ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/f0ef599895ae16be914843566133bed1.
 
Groffman, P., L. Martel, and P. Templer. 2020. Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: microbial biomass and activity at Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) plots, 2015 ver 2. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/4b227e978c45e8374e42ad0b50c32896.
 
UPDATED:
Groffman, P. and L. Martel. 2020. Long-term measurements of microbial biomass and activity at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, 1994 - present ver 21. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/d00b9dcf4280249a574a490d69074d28.
 
Groffman, P., L. Martel, and J. Duran. 2020. Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: microbial biomass and activity at climate gradient plots, 2010-2012 ver 4. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/512567c9267a93a7498ba811d1a5b491.
 
COMING SOON (in April):
Updates to Snow Depth, Snow Water, Mirror Lake Ice, and new data on Beetles, and the Ice Storm!
 
Outreach and Education Update
 
Sarah Thorne gave a workshop for the Massachusetts Environmental Education Society annual conference on March 4, entitled, "Lessons from Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: Climate Change and Forest Ecosystems."
 
Multiple events and products emerged from the wrap-up of the Ice Storm Experiment:
 
  • Sarah Garlick organized "Ice Storms in the Northern Forest: Symposium with Hubbard Brook Scientists" at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center in Concord on March 6. John Campbell, Bob Fahey, and Lindsey Rustad presented key findings from their study of the long-term ecological impacts of the 1998 ice storm and the first-ever ice storm experiment, conducted at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains in 2016–2017.
 
  • Lindsey Rustad gave a presentation about the Ice Storm Experiment for "Super Stellar Friday" at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center in Concord on March 6.
 
 
  • The Ice Storm Experiment at Hubbard Brook - Research Brief PDF, by Sarah Garlick and Lindsey Rustad
 
Lindsey Rustad recorded a 30-minute virtual tour of the Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (C-CASE) for Nepris. Watch it here:
 
As families around the country transition to working and learning from home, the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation put together a running list of some of our favorite online learning resources:
 
Save the Date
 
The next COS meeting is scheduled for April 30, 2020. The topic is “Model Data Fusion and Scenario Making at Hubbard Brook,” co-led by Jackie Matthes and Peter Groffman. This meeting will be a virtual meeting only, with audio and video connections.
 
Announcements
 
Following a three-year hiatus, the Northeastern States Research Cooperative (NSRC) has been revitalized, thanks to $2 million in funding for the 2020 fiscal year from the US Forest Service.The Hubbard Brook Research Foundation will lead the community engagement effort to ensure that funded projects align with on-the-ground issues in an economy and culture that depends on forest health. Read more here:
 
In September, Ashley Lang will begin an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Biology with Rich Phillips at Indiana University, where she will be based. They will also be closely collaborating with Jennifer Pett-Ridge at Lawrence Livermore National Lab in Livermore, CA.
 
Here's Ashley's description of the project:
 
"The goals of this project are to 1) quantify carbon and nitrogen in mineral-associated soil organic matter across the U.S. National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and 2) to understand more about the environmental conditions that favor mineral-associated organic matter formation and long-term persistence in soil. We are planning to test how vegetation characteristics, microbial communities, and soil mineralogy all interact to influence the amount of carbon and nitrogen associated with soil minerals. This is important because mineral-associated organic matter is thought to be less susceptible to decomposition (and subsequently adding to atmospheric CO2) than other forms of organic matter in soil, like partially-decayed roots and leaves. However, most of what we know about the formation of this material is site-specific, so it’s going to be useful to compare the drivers across many sites which vary in climate, soil, and forest type. We are planning to use archived soil that was collected at a subset of forested NEON sites, ranging from Alaska to Puerto Rico. 
 
On a more personal note, I am eager to continue working with folks at Hubbard Brook and I do intend to stay in close contact with the COS by attending meetings virtually."
 
Congratulations, Ashley!
 
Each Friday during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation will be sending out an email with brief updates from members of the Hubbard Brook community. If you'd like to share a written message or a video clip with your coworkers, please send it to sciencelinks@hubbardbrookfoundation.org.
 
Photos from the Field
 
To close out this month's newsletter, enjoy a couple of images from our favorite forest, courtesy of Ian Halm.
 
 
The trail camera captures a passing coyote on March 8 (click to enlarge.)
 
A snow-dusted Rain Gage 9 on March 31 (click to enlarge).
 
Thanks for reading!
 
As always, if you have any feedback or suggestions, please send us a note at sciencelinks@hubbardbrookfoundation.org.